Cell-phone use diminishes self-awareness of impaired driving

Sanbonmatsu, D. M., Strayer, D. L., Biondi, F., Behrends, A. A., and Moore, S. M.
Springer Publishing

This US study examined the driving errors of participants who drove on a simulator while talking on a cell phone compared to participants not talking on a cell phone. There were 100 number of participants in this study that ranged in age from 18 to 41 years. After completing this task, participants were asked to assess the safety of their driving. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of multitasking on performance monitoring and assessment. Results revealed that participants who talked on a cell phone while driving made more serious driving errors than participants who did not use a phone while driving. Notably, when drivers were talking on a cell phone, they were often unaware of inconsistencies in their speed, weaving across lanes, and near misses with other vehicles. It was concluded that talking on a cell phone not only decreased a driver’s ability to drive safely, but it also diminished their awareness of their ability to drive safely. In addition, results suggested that taking on multiple tasks simultaneously can be physically taxing and stressful, and contribute to poorer primary task performance.

Reference
Sanbonmatsu, D. M., Strayer, D. L., Biondi, F., Behrends, A. A., & Moore, S. M. (2016). Cell-phone use diminishes self-awareness of impaired driving. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 23(2), 617-623.