Does wearable device bring distraction closer to drivers? Comparing smartphones and Google Glass

Jibo He, Jason S. McCarley, Kirsten Crager, Murtuza Jadliwala, Lesheng Hua, and Shen Huang
Elsevier

This study was conducted as a means to understand the influence of wearables devices, such as Google Glass, on driving performance. Authors conducted a simulator study with 29 participants between the ages of 18 to 34 years. Participants drove the simulator on a straight three-lane highway and were instructed to follow a lead car in the middle lane. The middle lane was lined with cones that were placed 3.3 to 5.3 meters apart. While driving, participants performed a secondary task that included using a verbal texting app to receive, read, and respond to messages using either a smartphone or Google Glass. The Google Glass display was placed in front of the right eye, and the smartphone was placed on a table. During the drive, participants received approximately 11 messages that required a response. Results indicated that Google Glass allowed participants to respond to messages faster compared to using the smartphone, but both devices caused drivers to deviate from the lane they were driving in. Additionally, when using the Google Glass participants deviated from the speed limit more than when using the smartphone.

Reference
He, J., McCarley, J. S., Crager, K., Jadliwala, M., Hua, L., & Huang, S. (2018). Does wearable device bring distraction closer to drivers? Comparing smartphones and Google Glass. Applied Ergonomics, 70, 156-166.