Knowledge about crash risk factors and self-reported driving behaviour: Exploratory analysis on multi-state teen driver survey

Minjares-Kyle, L., Das, S., Medina, G., and Henk, R. H.
Texas A&M Transportation Institute

The objective of this research was to examine the self-reported driving behaviours of teen drivers. The survey was distributed to participants involved in the Texas program, Teens in the Driver Seat (TDS). TDS is a peer-to-peer safety program for young drivers in Texas. Surveys were distributed through the program and completed by 109,226 participants (51.8% female). The age range of participants was 14 to 18 years and more than one-quarter (26.7%) of participants indicated they were in Grade 11.

The survey consisted of three sections. The first section contained demographic questions such as age, school, gender, and grade level. The second section included an open-ended question to gauge knowledge among teens regarding the five most common factors that contribute to teens being hurt or killed in road crashes. The final section of the survey focused on the traffic safety background of participants and investigated their license status, driver education, crash and citation history, and crash history for family members. Questions that focused on risky driving behaviours (i.e., cell phone use, drinking and driving, speeding) and their frequency were also included in this section.

The top perceived risk factor identified by respondents varied according to gender. Male participants indicated the top perceived risks were driving, texting, phone use, speeding, and not wearing a seatbelt. Female participants cited drinking, phone use, talking, music, and eating as the top risks. Talking on a cell phone and texting were two of the most frequently self-reported risky driving behaviours among all participants. These two behaviours were also reported to occurred at a higher frequency.

Reference
Minjares-Kyle, L., Das, S., Medina, G., & Henk, R. (2018). Knowledge about crash risk factors and self-reported driving behaviour: Exploratory analysis on multi-state teen driver survey (No. 18-01857).