Near peripheral motion detection threshold correlates with self-reported failures of attention in younger and older drivers

Henderson, S.; Gagnon, S.; Belanger, A.; Tabone, R.; Collin, C.
Elsevier

The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential value of peripheral motion contrast threshold (PMCT) tests as a tool to assess the hazard detection capacity of drivers. A secondary goal of this research was to see how closely the two surveys related to one another and if the Driver Perception Questionnaire was validated by the Aging Driver Questionnaire. A total of 31 participants, aged 24 to 42 years and 65-84 years, took part in the study. Participants completed the Driver Perception Questionnaire and the Aging Driver Questionnaire, which measured failures in driver detection ability, and the results of each group were compared and contrasted.

Results showed that PMCT tests may be a potentially useful assessment tool for older drivers to gauge whether peripheral motion detection abilities have deteriorated with age in individual drivers. It was also shown that PMCT tests may be a fair assessment tool for use at any age to determine whether motion detection abilities have deteriorated at any point in times since the deterioration of these skills is not age-specific. In addition, findings showed that the two questionnaires were strongly related to each other, and both surveys were valid methods of testing. Authors proposed to advance this research by conducting on road or simulator experiments, and suggested that further research could identify additional tests to measure the abilities of drivers across all age ranges to detect hazards.

Reference
Henderson, S., Gagnon, S., BĂ©langer, A., Tabone, R., & Collin, C. (2010). Near peripheral motion detection threshold correlates with self-reported failures of attention in younger and older drivers. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 42(4), 1189-1194.