Texting/Emailing while driving among high school students in 35 states, United States, 2015

Li, L., Shults, R. A., Andridge, R. R., Yellman, M. A., Xiany, H., and Zhu, M.
Elsevier

The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of individual and state factors associated with texting or emailing while driving among teen drivers. Data were collected using the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) which includes 101,397 participants (60% male) from 35 states who had driven a vehicle within the previous 30 days. Participants ranged from 14 to 18 years old with an average age of 17. The YRBS is a biennial self-report survey that aims to monitor the prevalence of critical health risk behaviours among high school students.

Slightly more than one-third (38%) of participants reported texting or emailing while driving at least once within the previous 30 days. Based on multivariable analyses, the likelihood of texting or emailing while driving increased with age, among Caucasian students, and among infrequent seatbelt users who were 21% more likely to engage in texting or emailing while driving. Additionally, participants who reported drinking and driving were twice as likely to text or email while driving than participants who did not.

Reference
Li, L., Shults, R. A., Andridge, R. R., Yellman, M. A., Xiang, H., & Zhu, M. (2018). Texting/emailing while driving among high school students in 35 states, United States, 2015. Journal of Adolescent Health, 63(6), 701-708.